St-pats-badge

Click to view the Donnersmith Photography portfolios.

Click to go to an index of Stephencooks recipes by ingredients.

Scroll down to find recipes in the Stephencooks Recipe Box.

COURSE

Appetizers & Snacks
Breads
Breakfast
Brunch
Side Dishes
Soup
Salad
Drinks
Dessert

STYLE

Comfort Food
Chinese
Decadent
Grilled Food
Italian
Japanese
Pasta
Pizza
Roasted Vegetables
Sandwiches
Smoked Food

MAIN INGREDIENT

Beef
Chicken
Eggs
Lamb
Pork
Seafood
Veggies

NUTRITION

Healthy Recipes
Low Carb
Low Fat
Weight Watchers 0 Pt
Weight Watchers 1 Pt
Weight Watchers 2 Pts
Weight Watchers 3 Pts



MORE

Master Recipes
Leftovers
Quick Prep
Sauces
Tips & Tools
Wild Caught / Foraged



Recipe-finder-tag-bottom
Click to see Saveur's feature on my Rosemary Rutabaga Fries.

« Guacamole | Main | Roasted Baby Vidalia Onions with Balsamic Sweet-Sour Sauce »

Fish and Lobster Pie

Fish and Lobster Pie
  

Living on the coast in New England, with access to dock-fresh fish, is a constant inspiration to me in the kitchen, and a constant challenge. I almost always go into the fish market with no specific target in mind, preferring to see once I get there what's available, what looks good, what triggers an idea, what simply has to come home with me. Quite often the result is a bag of several different fish and a mind humming with thoughts of bouillabaisse, seafood stew, a nice chowder or pasta sauce, or some other way to use a mixed lot of fruits of the sea.

Thus was born my version of Fish and Lobster Pie, first made in 2000. It differs from most recipes for seafood pie, which are usually a mixture of fish and cheese baked in a pie shell, in that it's an adaptation of quiche, based on a savory egg and cream custard. This gives it a lighter feel than the cheese and fish pies (though no one would claim it's a diet preparation). The result is deeply flavorful and chock full of fresh fish and shellfish. Served with a salad, some French bread and a crisp sauvignon blanc, it makes a pleasant and casual supper for two, or four, at any time of year.

Fish and Lobster Pie

Makes 6 tartlets, 4" diameter

6 partially baked tartlet shells (recipe follows)
3 T flour
1 lb scallops, washed, cut 1/4 inch thick
6 oz cooked lobster or crab, cut into 3/4" pieces (reserve 4 claw pieces for decoration)
8 oz white fish, cut in 1" pieces
2 eggs
1/2 C minced onion
2 T minced shallots
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 C heavy cream
salt
hot sauce
pinch nutmeg
butter
olive oil
1 T fresh oregano, minced
1/2 bay leaf
2/3 cup white wine
3 oz grated Parmeggiano Reggiano
2 T butter cut in small pieces

Sauté onions and shallots and 2/3 of the garlic  slowly in butter and oil for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Set aside.

Toss scallops and fish in the flour and sauté in hot butter and oil about two minutes, stirring. Add the wine, oregano and bay leaf and simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened. Allow to cool.

Beat the eggs with the cream until well combined, add the fish/scallop mixture, the lobster, the remaining garlic, the nutmeg and the onion mixture. Stir to combine and season to taste with salt and hot sauce. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tart shells, being careful to distribute the seafood equally into the four shells.

Scatter  the cheese over the tarts, dot with butter and decorate with lobster claw meat. Bake 20-30 min in a preheated 400º oven, until puffed and beginning to brown and a tester comes out clean. If necessary, run under a broiler for a minute or two to brown the top.

Allow to rest 5 minutes or so before removing the tarts from the forms.

Pie Crust - Partially Cooked ("Blind Baked")

for a single crust pie or six 4" tartlet pans
3 C sifted all purpose flour
1-1/2  sticks cold butter
1/3 C vegetable shortening
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 C + 2 T ice water

Place the flour, butter, shortening, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and process briefly, until mixture looks like coarse corn meal.  Add the ice water and pulse processor a few times until dough begins to clump. Do not overprocess. Scrape dough onto a board put in a plastic food storage bag. Working through the bag, quickly press the dough into a ball. Refrigerate dough for at least an hour. (May be frozen at this point for future use.) Roll the ball out to about 1/8" thick. Butter the pie plate or tart pans and line with the dough.

Butter pieces of aluminum foil and line the crust in the tart pans with them, buttered side down. Fill the foil with dried beans or rice to a depth of about an inch -- this will keep the crust from puffing when it is baked empty. Bake for about 10 minutes in a preheated 400º oven. Crust should just start to brown. Allow to cool and then remove and discard the aluminum foil after returning the beans or rice to their container. Leave the tart pan rings in place.

The crust can be made up to four hours before the dish is assembled and served.

|

Click HERE for information about the new WeightWatchers PointsPlus program.

Like it? Share this recipe with your friends...

Share

   

   Email       ShareThis

Soda Club USA

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Comments

Stephen,

That's it. Rub our noses in your access to fresh seafood. Hell, even when I lived in Nashua, NH I had trouble finding fresh seafood.

I gotta tell ya - that sounds simply amazing!

Where in the dead of winter did you find fresh caught lobster? Do you know a rouge lobsta man?

Wow, this looks... well I want to eat it - right.now. I imagine it can make for a casual or a fancy dinner.

I am so going to bake a fish pie now. That looks incredible!

Unbelievably beautiful and sooooo delicious sounding, I'm drooling over my keyboard.

Not to mention how jealous I am for your access to fruits of the sea!!!

Thanks for sharing - I'm definitely bookmarking this post.

Last night my daughter and I made the Tuna with crusted Wasabi Peas, Somen Noodles with Miso and Vinegared Cucumbers recipes, with slight adjustments for what we can get here in the Midcoast,and WOW - what a fantastic meal. Love your recipes - keep up the great work!!

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear on this weblog until the author has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In.